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Aquaponics – Grow Vegetables in Your Pond

Imagine growing vegetables in your pond. You never have to water them, or fertilize them. Since ponds stay cooler than soil, cool growing crops like lettuce can be grown over a longer period of time. Ponds are a natural source of nutrients, especially if they contain fish, and these nutrients help vegetables grow aquaponically. Not only do you produce food but the growing vegetables help keep algae levels low.

Vegetables can be grown right in the pond or in an associated bog garden without any extra equipment. Or you can get more serious about this and pump water to an external hydroponic growing area.

Lettuce ready to harvest from a Styrofoam raft floating on a pond

Lettuce ready to harvest from a Styrofoam raft floating on a pond

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10 Top Gardening Stories of 2017

2017 has come and gone and it was another successful year – but then again my opinion is very biased. We posted numerous in-depth articles and lots of Favorite Plants. And Garden Fundamentals YouTube manged to add a new video before the end of the year; the myth of leaving leaves on the lawn.

You are going to see changes this year and I think you will like them all.

  • I will continue posting on this blog so nothing will really change here except that you can expect more posts about garden design.
  • Early in the year I will be posting several new videos on YouTube.
  • The new Facebook Group; Garden Fundamentals now has 334 members and is growing quickly. If you have not joined yet, do so right now so you don’t miss any of the great discussions going on there.
  • You might have noticed a change in the site header and our logo. I’m trying to brand all of the Garden Fundamentals sites into one family. I also hope to give this site a whole new look this summer.

Please join Garden Fundamentals Facebook Group now!

Around the middle of January I will be sending out the first issue of Garden Fundamentals News – our new monthly newsletter, which will be chocked full of gardening information. This will be an important way for me to communicate with you. If you have not already subscribed you can do so using the form on the banner to the right.

It is now time to look back at 2017 and review some of the best posts of the year: the 10 Top Gardening Stories of 2017.

Aspen Grove Gardens, my garden, 2017

Aspen Grove Gardens, my garden, 2017

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Clematis alpina

Clematis alpina, by Robert Pavlis

Clematis alpina, by Robert Pavlis

Clematis alpina is a very hardy, early flowering vine that adds a great splash of color to your spring garden and then goes on to make interesting seed heads in late summer. As seen in the picture below, I grow it in a planter, in zone 5 and leave it outside all year. You can also plant it in the garden and just about forget about it. It doesn’t need to be pruned, and it will not take over most trees and shrubs the way some larger clematis do.

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Heptacodium miconioides

Heptacodium miconioides, by Robert Pavlis

Heptacodium miconioides, by Robert Pavlis

Heptacodium miconioidesis a small tree or large shrub that provides year long interest, especially in late summer and fall when it appears to flower twice; once in white and then again in red. The white flowers form in bunches of 7 which gives the plant its common name of seven sons plant. After flowering, it forms small fruits and red calyx that are as large as and showier than the flowers.  —————- Read More —————-

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Garden Fundamentals – Meets Facebook

First of all, let me thank all of my regular viewers for making this such a popular site. We are approaching 200,000 visitors, and that is fantastic.

If you are not a regular viewer, please subscribe by entering your email in the top right hand corner, under “Subscribe to this Blog”. This will provide you with an email notice each time I make a new post.

We have had a lot of good comments on the site, but comments on blogs are not a great way to communicate and discuss topics. I want to expand the ability to connect with you, my readers, and to connect all of you to each other. To meet this goal I have set up a Facebook Group, called Garden Fundamentals.

Facebook: Garden Fundamentalshttps://www.facebook.com/groups/GardenFundamentals/

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